Long Exposures from the International Space Station

 ISS Star Trails

ISS Star Trails

"My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure." -Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit

 

 iss2

iss2

 iss3

iss3

 iss4

iss4

 iss5

iss5

Salt Flats

rolliefree.png

Incredible photograph of Roland “Rollie” Free at the Bonneville Salt Flats. From Wikipedia, “…when his leathers tore from early runs at 147 mph, he discarded them and made a final attempt without jacket, pants, gloves, boots or helmet. Free lay flat on the motorcycle wearing only a Speedo bathing suit, a shower cap, and a pair of borrowed sneakers…”

Leica M-Monochrom

Leica recently released a body specifically dedicated to Black and White photography. From the press release: “For the first time ever, we are offering an opportunity to consistently and authentically explore black-and-white photography with the M Monochrom, a tool that is unique in the digital world. The camera’s exclusively black-and-white sensor brings an enormous technical benefit that is reflected in the amazing imaging quality it delivers.” Read a good review here.

1925 Portrait of an Opium Dealer

Special Photograph no. 1399. this picture appears in the Photo Supplement to the NSW Police Gazette, 28 July, 1926 captioned: 'Opium dealer./ Operates with large quantities of faked opium and cocaine./ A wharf labourer; associates with water front thieves and drug traders.' 

This picture is one of a series of around 2500 "special photographs" taken by New South Wales Police Department photographers between 1910 and 1930. These "special photographs" were mostly taken in the cells at the Central Police Station, Sydney and are, as curator Peter Doyle explains, of "men and women recently plucked from the street, often still animated by the dramas surrounding their apprehension". Doyle suggests that, compared with the subjects of prison mug shots, "the subjects of the Special Photographs seem to have been allowed - perhaps invited - to position and compose themselves for the camera as they liked. Their photographic identity thus seems constructed out of a potent alchemy of inborn disposition, personal history, learned habits and idiosyncrasies, chosen personal style (haircut, clothing, accessories) and physical characteristics."

Real Life Rosie

27.jpg

“October 1942. Riveter at work on a bomber at the Consolidated Aircraft factory in Fort Worth. 4×5 Kodachrome transparency by Howard Hollem.”

A selection of Kodachrome scans of the WWII manufacturing effort. Many real life “Rosie the Riveters.”